Public/Private Ventures (P/PV)

Legacy Collection

Innovation. Research. Action.

After almost 35 years Public/Private Ventures (P/PV) has ceased operations. The organization leaves behind an incredible legacy of knowledge, including hundreds of research reports, case studies and evaluations about how best to improve programs and outcomes for children, youth and families. We are fortunate that P/PV has decided to archive its publications collection with the Foundation Center's IssueLab so that practitioners can benefit from this knowledge for years to come.

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Early Outcomes for Programs and Families in Children's Futures

January 8, 2010

Assesses the programmatic achievements and outcomes for families in the first five years of a community change initiative providing an array of social services. Discusses lessons learned and issues of cost, partnership development, and sustainability.

Working Dads: Final Report on the Fathers at Work Initiative Executive Summary

October 1, 2009

This executive summary draws on findings from P/PV's evaluation of Fathers at Work, a national demonstration funded by the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation. The demonstration was designed to help low-income noncustodial fathers increase their employment and earnings, become more involved in their children's lives, and provide them with more consistent financial support.The Fathers at Work programs offered a unique combination of job training and placement, child support and fatherhood services at six well-established community-based organizations in Chicago, IL; New York, NY; Philadelphia, PA; Richmond, CA; and Roanoke, VA. Our findings suggest that the programs produced important benefits for participants, including increased earnings and child support payments.The summary presents an overview of the initiative's implementation activities and participant outcomes and explores implications for policy, programs and researchers.

Collaboration and Community Change in the Children's Futures Initiative

February 28, 2009

In 2002, The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation launched Children's Futures (CF), a 10-year community change initiative designed to improve the health and well-being of children from birth to age three throughout Trenton, NJ. CF's strategies included efforts to increase residents' access to prenatal and other health services, provide parenting skills education, improve the quality of available childcare and promote preventive healthcare among medical practices. The Foundation engaged P/PV to evaluate the implementation and outcomes of the initiative and to provide ongoing feedback on its progress.This report, and its forthcoming companion, Early Outcomes in a Community Change Effort to Improve Children's Futures, examine the promise of CF strategies. Collaboration and Community Change in the Children's Futures Initiative focuses on program implementation, participant recruitment and collaborations among Trenton's agencies. The second report examines programmatic improvements and early outcomes for CF families. Major findings from both are compiled in Children's Futures' First Five Years.

Navigating the Child Support System: Lessons from the Fathers at Work Initiative

February 10, 2009

Research shows that nearly half of all children born in the US today will be eligible for child support before they reach the age of 18. Many low-income, noncustodial fathers -- who often struggle to make these payments -- will seek services from workforce development organizations. Yet, understanding the child support enforcement system can be challenging -- not only for noncustodial fathers but also for the workforce organizations that want to assist them.Navigating the Child Support System aims to help meet this challenge by providing information, resources and tools to use at the intersection of workforce development and child support enforcement. The guide is based on lessons from the Fathers at Work initiative, a three-year, six-site demonstration funded by the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, which was designed to help young, noncustodial fathers achieve increased employment and earnings, involvement in their children's lives, and more consistent financial support of their children.The guide describes child support enforcement regulations, policies and actions that can affect fathers' willingness to seek formal employment and participate in the system, and provides examples of four services that organizations might offer to benefit fathers and their families. Navigating the Child Support System offers concrete suggestions for incorporating child support services into workforce organizations' assistance to low-income, male participants, including developing partnerships with local child support enforcement agencies. It includes seven tools for learning about child support and setting goals for enhancing services to noncustodial fathers.

Children's Futures' First Five Years: Lessons and Early Outcomes of a Community Change Initiative

August 8, 2008

In 2002, The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation launched an early childhood initiative in Trenton, NJ, called Children's Futures (CF) to determine if focused efforts to bring about community change could make measurable differences in children's health and well-being and help ensure their readiness to enter school. The Foundation engaged P/PV to evaluate the implementation and outcomes of this ambitious initiative and to provide ongoing feedback on its progress. Children's Futures' First Five Years provides a summary of our findings, based on two longer forthcoming reports: Collaboration and Community Change, which investigates the initiative's major strategies and highlights collaborative practices, and Early Outcomes for Programs and Families in Children's Futures, which examines programmatic improvements and early outcomes for CF families.

Going to Work with a Criminal Record: Lessons from the Fathers at Work Initiative

May 30, 2008

Many of the 650,000 adults released from American prisons each year find their way to One-Stops or community-based, faith-based and other organizations that provide employment services. Yet relatively few of these organizations specifically target former prisoners. Workforce development practitioners have experience with a wide range of job seekers, but a great number of them are looking for additional guidance about the complexities of connecting formerly incarcerated people to the labor market and helping them stay on the job.Going to Work with a Criminal Record was developed to help meet this need. It is based on lessons from the Fathers at Work initiative, a three-year, six-site demonstration funded by the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation to help young, noncustodial fathers achieve increased employment and earnings, involvement in their childrens lives, and more consistent financial support of their children. The report describes seven fundamental lessons workforce organizations should consider as they help formerly incarcerated people move toward stable employment, along with a more detailed discussion of how program staff can put these lessons into practice. It outlines how to avoid mistakes and how to develop important relationships, including with employers, parole officers and the local child support enforcement agency.

Young Fathers Video and Workshop Guide

September 30, 2007

This two-disc package features the award-winning Young Fathers documentary, which focuses on two young fathers, Dupree and Anthony, providing an intimate portrait of their lives, especially their relationships with their children. The film explores the challenges of early parenthood, healthy co-parenting relationships, child support and marriage issues. Anthonys and Duprees experiences highlight the circumstances of many low-income fathers, including those who have been involved with the criminal justice system.The package also includes discussion guides and lesson plans that are appropriate for a range of different settings and audiencesin employment and reentry programs, parenting and marriage workshops, with students in the classroom, program staff and partner agencies.

Leaving the Street In Brief

July 7, 2007

This issue of P/PV In Brief focuses on Lauren J. Kotloff's recent report, Leaving the Street: Young Fathers Move from Hustling to Legitimate Work. Based on an in-depth interview study of participants in P/PVs Fathers at Work initiative, the report provides a rare glimpse inside the lives of young urban men with criminal records, exploring how they got involved with hustling, their experiences in the labor market and their feelings about fatherhood.Leaving the Street In Brief describes the four distinct groups that emerged in P/PVs study (the Reluctant Hustlers, the Ambitious Workers, the Reluctant Workers and the Committed Hustlers) and presents early findings from the Fathers at Work evaluation. It also touches on the full report's recommendations for programs serving young fathers.

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