Public/Private Ventures (P/PV)

Legacy Collection

Innovation. Research. Action.

After almost 35 years Public/Private Ventures (P/PV) has ceased operations. The organization leaves behind an incredible legacy of knowledge, including hundreds of research reports, case studies and evaluations about how best to improve programs and outcomes for children, youth and families. We are fortunate that P/PV has decided to archive its publications collection with the Foundation Center's IssueLab so that practitioners can benefit from this knowledge for years to come.

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Building from the Ground Up: Creating Effective Programs to Mentor Children of Prisoners (The Amachi Model)

July 30, 2005

Drawing from P/PVs five years of hands-on experience designing and implementing Amachi programs around the country, Building From The Ground Up describes best practices for planning, developing and managing a mentoring-children-of-prisoners program. This guidebook is essential for learning the professional procedures, standards and administrative tools required to have an effective program.

Community Change for Youth Development: Ten Lessons from the CCYD Initiative

December 1, 2002

From 1995 through 2002, P/PV worked with six neighborhoods around the country to develop and institute a framework of "core concepts" to guide youth programming for the nonschool hours. The goal was to create programming that would involve a high proportion of each neighborhood's several thousand adolescents. This report summarizes the basic lessons that emerged from this Community Change for Youth Development (CCYD) initiative. The lessons address such topics as the usefulness of a "core concepts" approach; the dos and don'ts of involving neighborhood residents in change initiatives; the role of research; the role of youth; and the capacity of neighborhood-wide approaches to attract high-risk youth.

Community Change for Youth Development in Kansas City

October 30, 2001

Kansas City, Missouri, is one of six sites in Community Change for Youth Development (CCYD), a national demonstration project aiming to increase basic supports and opportunities available to youth aged 12-20. The lead agency is the YMCA of Greater Kansas City; because of its considerable organizational capacity and relationship with funders, the YMCA was successful in operating and expanding CCYD. This report focuses on the benefits of working with the YMCA of Greater Kansas City and the challenges faced by the organization in leading a community-based initiative in three urban neighborhoods.

Resident Involvement in Community Change: The Experiences of Two Initiatives

June 12, 1999

The 1990s saw a resurgence of interest in community development initiatives targeting poor and disadvantaged communities. That resurgence involves at least one major assumption: that involving residents -- both adults and youth -- creates community ownership and increases grassroots participation in ways that will ultimately lead to stronger, more sustainable initiatives. This report examines the development of resident involvement strategies in eight sites participating in P/PV's Community Change for Youth Development (CCYD) initiative and Plain Talk, The Annie E. Casey Foundation's initiative to prevent teen pregnancy (which P/PV evaluated). The authors identify three stages of resident involvement observed across all eight sites; document the ways in which residents contributed to the local site activities; and discuss the challenges of resident governance strategies.

Support for Youth: A Profile of Three Communities (a Community Change for Youth Development [CCYD] report)

March 15, 1998

Over the past decade, increasing attention has been given to nonschool hours as a vehicle for providing some of the basic supports -- caring adult attention and guidance, career development, and opportunities to engage in positive learning and enrichment activities -- that encourage positive youth development. This report examines the assumptions that youth with higher levels of support are more successful in school, work and their communities, and that youth in moderately poor urban communities lack adequate supports. Community-wide surveys completed in 1996 in three communities -- Austin, Savannah, and St. Petersburg (Florida) -- found a discouraging decline in supports and opportunities as youth get older. From 15 to 25 percent of youth 18 years and older were not engaged in any positive structured activities, had very few adults in their lives, and were not working.

Summer Training and Education Program (STEP): Report on 1986 Experiences

April 19, 1988

The Summer Training and Education Program (STEP) was a five-site demonstration program offering two summers of remediation, life skills instruction and work experience to a randomly assigned group of economically and academically disadvantaged 14- and 15-year-olds. P/PVs early evaluation of STEP showed promising results in its ability to stem reading losses and achieve gains in math. STEP youth also increased their knowledge of sexual responsibility and were more likely to use contraceptives if they were sexually active. This report reflects on the outcomes of two cohorts of the STEP program, which includes a cost-benefit analysis of the program and its implications for future policies. STEPs operational experience and test results seem to confirm both the feasibility and importance of extended educational programming during the summers for high-risk students.

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