Public/Private Ventures (P/PV)

Legacy Collection

Innovation. Research. Action.

After almost 35 years Public/Private Ventures (P/PV) has ceased operations. The organization leaves behind an incredible legacy of knowledge, including hundreds of research reports, case studies and evaluations about how best to improve programs and outcomes for children, youth and families. We are fortunate that P/PV has decided to archive its publications collection with the Foundation Center's IssueLab so that practitioners can benefit from this knowledge for years to come.

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11 results found

Rising to the Challenge: The Strategies of Social Service Intermediaries

February 22, 2012

During the past decade, "intermediary organizations" have proliferated across the nonprofit sector. These organizations are typically positioned between funding entities (e.g., government agencies, foundations and corporations) and direct service providers. Intermediaries play an important roll in connecting organizations that share a common interest--and working to enhance the services these organizations provide, build larger service networks, promote quality standards, and monitor programs on behalf of funders.

Using Data in Multi-Agency Collaborations: Guiding Performance to Ensure Accountability and Improve Programs

February 22, 2012

A growing number of foundation- and government-funded initiatives are bringing together diverse partners within communities -- to create screening and referral systems, to coordinate and deliver services and to advocate for policy changes -- all in the interest of serving clients more effectively. Many of these efforts emphasize the use of evidence-based programs, and there is increasing recognition that to be successful, collaborating agencies must work together to collect relevant data and use it to inform and improve their programming.

Early Outcomes for Programs and Families in Children's Futures

January 8, 2010

Assesses the programmatic achievements and outcomes for families in the first five years of a community change initiative providing an array of social services. Discusses lessons learned and issues of cost, partnership development, and sustainability.

Collaboration and Community Change in the Children's Futures Initiative

February 28, 2009

In 2002, The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation launched Children's Futures (CF), a 10-year community change initiative designed to improve the health and well-being of children from birth to age three throughout Trenton, NJ. CF's strategies included efforts to increase residents' access to prenatal and other health services, provide parenting skills education, improve the quality of available childcare and promote preventive healthcare among medical practices. The Foundation engaged P/PV to evaluate the implementation and outcomes of the initiative and to provide ongoing feedback on its progress.This report, and its forthcoming companion, Early Outcomes in a Community Change Effort to Improve Children's Futures, examine the promise of CF strategies. Collaboration and Community Change in the Children's Futures Initiative focuses on program implementation, participant recruitment and collaborations among Trenton's agencies. The second report examines programmatic improvements and early outcomes for CF families. Major findings from both are compiled in Children's Futures' First Five Years.

Children's Futures' First Five Years: Lessons and Early Outcomes of a Community Change Initiative

August 8, 2008

In 2002, The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation launched an early childhood initiative in Trenton, NJ, called Children's Futures (CF) to determine if focused efforts to bring about community change could make measurable differences in children's health and well-being and help ensure their readiness to enter school. The Foundation engaged P/PV to evaluate the implementation and outcomes of this ambitious initiative and to provide ongoing feedback on its progress. Children's Futures' First Five Years provides a summary of our findings, based on two longer forthcoming reports: Collaboration and Community Change, which investigates the initiative's major strategies and highlights collaborative practices, and Early Outcomes for Programs and Families in Children's Futures, which examines programmatic improvements and early outcomes for CF families.

Growing Bigger Better: Lessons from Experience Corps' Expansion in Five Cities

June 25, 2008

Going to scale often entails replicating a program in new locations, but it can also involve efforts to expand a programs reach in existing locations, enabling it to have a greater effect on communities already being served. This was the case with Experience Corps, a Civic Ventures program that enlists older adults as volunteers to help strengthen literacy and other skills of elementary school students in low-income neighborhoods. Beginning in 2001, with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and The Atlantic Philanthropies, Experience Corps embarked on a four-year initiative to expand in five cities. P/PV examined the five sites efforts to increase the size of their volunteer pool and expand to additional schools, manage their larger and more complex programs, and raise sufficient funds to meet annual goals and sustain growth.Growing Bigger Better considers how the sites initial readiness to expand, the organizational resources they possessed, and the receptivity of the external environment (i.e., the local school districts) shaped the sites progress. The report reflects on whether and how the local sites, and the program as a whole, benefited from the expansion effort, drawing out lessons that are relevant to other programs considering expansion. It concludes that while program expansion is a major undertaking, the Experience Corps expansion initiative clearly demonstrates how programs can become stronger, more energized and even more innovative through carefully planned and managed growth, and thus extend the benefits of their services to larger numbers of individuals and communities.

Growing Bigger Better: Lessons from Experience Corps Expansion in Five Cities Executive Summary

June 25, 2008

This summary presents key findings from the full report, Growing Bigger Better, which examines the Experience Corps programs four-year expansion initiative. The summary briefly considers whether and how the local sites, and the program as a whole, benefited from the expansion effort and presents lessons that are relevant to other programs considering expansion.

Rewards of Giving: An In-Depth Study of Older Adults' Volunteer Experiences in Urban Elementary Schools

June 19, 2006

Rewards of Giving is based on interviews with 43 volunteers in Experience Corps, a national service program that recruits, trains and places teams of older adults in underserved urban elementary schools as tutors and mentors. The study offers a rich understanding of what motivates Americans over 55 to volunteer, the challenges and rewards they experience through civic engagement and key program supports that contribute to meaningful service work. Rewards of Giving provides important insights to practitioners and funders about creating and investing in high-quality, high-yield program models that effectively attract and retain older adult volunteers.

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