Public/Private Ventures (P/PV)

Legacy Collection

Innovation. Research. Action.

After almost 35 years Public/Private Ventures (P/PV) has ceased operations. The organization leaves behind an incredible legacy of knowledge, including hundreds of research reports, case studies and evaluations about how best to improve programs and outcomes for children, youth and families. We are fortunate that P/PV has decided to archive its publications collection with the Foundation Center's IssueLab so that practitioners can benefit from this knowledge for years to come.

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Using Data for Success: Five Activities for Workforce Managers to Use with Frontline Staff

January 26, 2009

Commissioned by the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation and based on input from its grantees and other practitioners, "Using Data for Success" is designed to help workforce development organizations use data to improve their performance and the well-being of their clients.

Community Change for Youth Development: Ten Lessons from the CCYD Initiative

December 1, 2002

From 1995 through 2002, P/PV worked with six neighborhoods around the country to develop and institute a framework of "core concepts" to guide youth programming for the nonschool hours. The goal was to create programming that would involve a high proportion of each neighborhood's several thousand adolescents. This report summarizes the basic lessons that emerged from this Community Change for Youth Development (CCYD) initiative. The lessons address such topics as the usefulness of a "core concepts" approach; the dos and don'ts of involving neighborhood residents in change initiatives; the role of research; the role of youth; and the capacity of neighborhood-wide approaches to attract high-risk youth.

Youth Development: Issues, Challenges and Directions

September 2, 2000

During the past decade there has been considerable concern and discussion about what Americans can do to improve the lives and life prospects of our youth. The changing economy, the stress on family and community life that changing economy brings, concern about the adequacy of public education, the highly publicized incidents of gun violence in schools and the very large cohort of teenagers that this decade brings have only heightened the legitimacy, and the rhetoric, of that concern. In this volume of nine essays, leading researchers and practitioners in the field of youth development share what they have learned over the past decade about the potential challenges of the "youth development approach" and offer some suggestions about how to proceed in the coming decade.

Summer Training and Education Program (STEP): Report on 1986 Experiences

April 19, 1988

The Summer Training and Education Program (STEP) was a five-site demonstration program offering two summers of remediation, life skills instruction and work experience to a randomly assigned group of economically and academically disadvantaged 14- and 15-year-olds. P/PVs early evaluation of STEP showed promising results in its ability to stem reading losses and achieve gains in math. STEP youth also increased their knowledge of sexual responsibility and were more likely to use contraceptives if they were sexually active. This report reflects on the outcomes of two cohorts of the STEP program, which includes a cost-benefit analysis of the program and its implications for future policies. STEPs operational experience and test results seem to confirm both the feasibility and importance of extended educational programming during the summers for high-risk students.

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