Public/Private Ventures (P/PV)

Legacy Collection

Innovation. Research. Action.

After almost 35 years Public/Private Ventures (P/PV) has ceased operations. The organization leaves behind an incredible legacy of knowledge, including hundreds of research reports, case studies and evaluations about how best to improve programs and outcomes for children, youth and families. We are fortunate that P/PV has decided to archive its publications collection with the Foundation Center's IssueLab so that practitioners can benefit from this knowledge for years to come.

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14 results found

What Matters, What Works: Advancing Achievement After School

February 1, 2008

This brief provides highlights from "Advancing Achievement: Findings from an Independent Evaluation of a Major After-School Initiative." The brief underscores the potential of after-school programs in the ongoing drive to advance children's academic achievement. It shines a light on some of the issues that matter most for programs striving to promote academic success -- namely, program quality and youth engagement. The brief also suggests what works by linking these program attributes to academic benefits. Like the report on which it is based, the brief draws lessons from the Communities Organizing Resources to Advance Learning (CORAL) initiative of The James Irvine Foundation.

Advancing Achievement: Findings from an Independent Evaluation of a Major After-School Initiative

February 1, 2008

This report presents outcomes from Public/Private Ventures research on CORAL, an eight-year, $58 million after-school initiative of The James Irvine Foundation. Findings described in the report demonstrate the relationship between high-quality literacy programming and academic gains and underscore the potential role that quality programs may play in the ongoing drive to improve academic achievement. The report includes a 12-page executive summary.

Gaining Ground: Supporting English Learners Through After-School Literacy Programming

February 1, 2008

This brief presents findings that demonstrate a relationship between key approaches in CORAL, an eight-year, $58 million after-school initiative of The James Irvine Foundation, and the academic progress of English learners. In addition to presenting findings, the brief suggests important considerations for any policymaker and funder interested in the success of English learners as a growing student population.

Supporting Success: Why and How to Improve Quality in After-School Programs

February 1, 2008

This report examines the program improvement strategies, step-by-step, that allowed The James Irvine Foundation's CORAL initiative to achieve the levels of quality needed to boost the academic success of participating students. And, it makes specific policy and funding suggestions for improving program performance. Communities Organizing Resources to Advance Learning (CORAL) is an eight-year, $58 million after-school initiative to improve educational achievement in low-performing schools in five California cities.

Midcourse Corrections to a Major Initiative: A Report on The James Irvine Foundation's CORAL Initiative

May 1, 2007

This report draws lessons from the reorientation of the Communities Organizing Resources to Advance Learning (CORAL) initiative. CORAL is a $58 million initiative aimed at improving education achievement in low-performing schools in five California cities. The report outlines the inherent challenges to making midcourse corrections to major initiatives. It also reveals lessons that foundations and nonprofits can learn from the CORAL experience, including the importance of midcourse reviews for multiyear initiatives and the value of setting clear and measurable interim outcomes.

A Portrait of Preteens in Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties: What We Know About 9- to 13-Year Olds

January 5, 2006

This report, commissioned by the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health and the Preteen Alliance, presents a profile of the preteen population in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties in California. Data compiled from a wide variety of sources depict the demographic and economic characteristics of the preteen population in the two counties, as well as detailed information about their emotional, behavioral, physical and academic health compared to available data on preteens in the state and the nation. Recommendations to increase community awareness about the particular issues and needs of youth in this age range and to address gaps in available data are offered.

Promoting Emotional and Behavioral Health in Preteens: Benchmarks of Success and Challenges Among Programs in Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties

May 30, 2004

P/PV conducted a two-year study for The Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health to assess the effectiveness of the foundation's youth development grantmaking program and to offer lessons for future grantmaking endeavors. The resulting report describes benchmarks of quality programs for youth and strategies for addressing common program challenges.

By Design: Engaging Employers in Workforce Development Organizations

December 9, 2003

Workforce development practitioners and policymakers have come to recognize the importance of employers as customers. Too often, however, not enough time is devoted to considering (much less implementing) the organizational and programmatic changes necessary to truly engage employers. By Design describes strategies used by three organizations to effectively engage employers in workforce development efforts. Jewish Vocational Service, San Francisco; Training, Inc., Boston and WIRE-Net, Cleveland, have successfully involved employers in a variety of different waysfrom including them on the Board of Directors to having them teach training classes. By Design outlines employer-engagement strategies in detail to help other organizations substantively involve employers in daily activities and services.

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