Public/Private Ventures (P/PV)

Legacy Collection

Innovation. Research. Action.

After almost 35 years Public/Private Ventures (P/PV) has ceased operations. The organization leaves behind an incredible legacy of knowledge, including hundreds of research reports, case studies and evaluations about how best to improve programs and outcomes for children, youth and families. We are fortunate that P/PV has decided to archive its publications collection with the Foundation Center's IssueLab so that practitioners can benefit from this knowledge for years to come.

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Illuminating Solutions: The Youth Violence Reduction Partnership

June 1, 2012

Over the last decade, P/PV has undertaken several studies of the Philadelphia-based Youth Violence Reduction Partnership (YVRP), an intensive collaboration that targets young people deemed at highest risk of being involved in a homicide. YVRP provides young probationers with enhanced supervision and support, with the goal of keeping them out of trouble and putting them on a path toward productive adulthood.

AfterZone: Outcomes for Youth Participating in Providence's Citywide After-School System, Executive Summary

September 30, 2011

This executive summary highlights the main findings from our participation and outcomes analysis of the AfterZone initiative a citywide system-building effort in Providence, RI, that aims to provide high-quality, accessible out-of-school-time services to middle school youth.

AfterZone: Outcomes for Youth Participating in Providence's Citywide After-School System

August 17, 2011

Presents findings from an evaluation of an afterschool program model that features a wide range of school- and community-based activities for middle school youth, a central coordinating body, and strong roots in the school context. Outlines implications.

Recruiting and Retaining Older African American and Hispanic Boys in After-School Programs: What We Know and What We Still Need to Learn

June 1, 2010

This brief is the third in P/PV's GroundWork series, which aims to summarize available evidence on a variety of social policy topics to provide a firm foundation for future work. Created in partnership with the Collaborative for Building After-School Systems (CBASS), the brief provides an overview of promising strategies for recruiting and retaining middle- and high-school-aged African-American and Hispanic males in after-school programs.The brief's findings are based on a review of relevant literature and interviews with 10 after-school programs identified by CBASS intermediaries as successful in these areas. The strategies identified mirror the strategies deemed important for recruiting and retaining older youth more broadly -- regardless of race and gender -- and include accessibility, cultural relevance and flexibility. However the programs interviewed did tailor these strategies to meet the specific needs of older minority boys. While this brief provides a starting point for future research, further work is needed, particularly given the positive outcomes associated with sustained participation in high-quality after-school programs and the challenges many programs face in attracting and retaining this population.

High School Students as Mentors: Findings From the Big Brothers Big Sisters School-Based Mentoring Impact Study Executive Summary

September 25, 2008

Recently, high schools have become a popular source of mentors for school-based mentoring (SBM) programs. This executive summary outlines key findings and recommendations from our High School Students as Mentors report, which drew on data from our large-scale random assignment impact study of Big Brothers Big Sisters SBM (Herrera, et al. 2007). Our research indicated that, on average, high school students were much less effective than adults at yielding impacts for the youth they mentor, but it also identified several program practices that were linked with longer, stronger and more effective high school mentor relationships.

High School Students as Mentors: Findings From the Big Brothers Big Sisters School-Based Mentoring Impact Study

September 19, 2008

High schools have recently become a popular source of mentors for school-based mentoring (SBM) programs. The high school Bigs program of Big Brothers Big Sisters of America, for example, currently involves close to 50,000 high-school-aged mentors across the country. While the use of these young mentors has several potential advantages, their age raises questions about their capacity to be consistent, positive role models, and, in turn, their potential to yield strong impacts for the youth they mentor.With support from The Atlantic Philanthropies and in collaboration with Big Brothers Big Sisters of America, P/PV set out to address these questions using data from our large-scale random assignment impact study of Big Brothers Big Sisters SBM (Herrera, et al. 2007). We found that, on average, high school students were much less effective than adults at yielding impacts for the youth they mentor. However, our research identified several program practices that were linked with longer, stronger and more effective high school mentor relationships. High School Students as Mentors stresses the need for programs with high school volunteers to use the inherent strengths of these volunteers and, at the same time, meet their distinct needs. Big Brothers Big Sisters of America is already initiating most of the changes suggested in the study in its high school Bigs program; it has convened a group of six of its strongest Big Brothers Big Sisters agencies to review these and other findings and share their own experiences and strategies in an effort to strengthen their model.

Making a Difference in Schools: The Big Brothers Big Sisters School-Based Mentoring Impact Study

August 1, 2007

School-based mentoring is one of the fastest growing forms of mentoring in the US today; yet, few studies have rigorously examined its impacts. This landmark random assignment impact study of Big Brothers Big Sisters School-Based Mentoring is the first national study of this program model. It involves 10 agencies, 71 schools and 1,139 9- to 16-year-old youth randomly assigned to either a treatment group of program participants or a control group of their non-mentored peers. Surveys were administered to all participating youth, their teachers and mentors in the fall of 2004, spring of 2005 and late fall of 2005.The report describes the programs and their participants and answers several key questions, including: Does school-based mentoring work? What kinds of mentoring experiences help to ensure benefits? How much do these programs cost? Our findings highlight both the strengths of this program model and its current limitations and suggest several recommendations for refining this promising model-recommendations that Big Brothers Big Sisters agencies across the country are already working to implement.

Making a Difference in Schools: The Big Brothers Big Sisters School-Based Mentoring Impact Study Executive Summary

June 26, 2007

Serving almost 870,000 youth nationwide, school-based mentoring is one of the fastest growing forms of mentoring in the US today. Making a Difference in Schools presents findings from a landmark random assignment impact study of Big Brothers Big Sisters School-Based Mentoring -- the first national study of this program model. This executive summary highlights nine key findings from the full report and outlines several recommendations for policy and practice.

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