Public/Private Ventures (P/PV)

Legacy Collection

Innovation. Research. Action.

After almost 35 years Public/Private Ventures (P/PV) has ceased operations. The organization leaves behind an incredible legacy of knowledge, including hundreds of research reports, case studies and evaluations about how best to improve programs and outcomes for children, youth and families. We are fortunate that P/PV has decided to archive its publications collection with the Foundation Center's IssueLab so that practitioners can benefit from this knowledge for years to come.

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Making a Difference in Schools: The Big Brothers Big Sisters School-Based Mentoring Impact Study

August 1, 2007

School-based mentoring is one of the fastest growing forms of mentoring in the US today; yet, few studies have rigorously examined its impacts. This landmark random assignment impact study of Big Brothers Big Sisters School-Based Mentoring is the first national study of this program model. It involves 10 agencies, 71 schools and 1,139 9- to 16-year-old youth randomly assigned to either a treatment group of program participants or a control group of their non-mentored peers. Surveys were administered to all participating youth, their teachers and mentors in the fall of 2004, spring of 2005 and late fall of 2005.The report describes the programs and their participants and answers several key questions, including: Does school-based mentoring work? What kinds of mentoring experiences help to ensure benefits? How much do these programs cost? Our findings highlight both the strengths of this program model and its current limitations and suggest several recommendations for refining this promising model-recommendations that Big Brothers Big Sisters agencies across the country are already working to implement.

AmeriCorps in the Field: Implementation of the National and Community Service Trust Act in Nine Study States

July 6, 2007

This report presents the results of P/PVs 30-month study of the implementation of AmeriCorps, the signature program of the National and Community Service Trust Act of 1993. In particular, it documents the federal-state relationship, the role that states played, and the individual challenges and successes of various sites as they developed their programs. The report concludes that AmeriCorps was successful in rapidly implementing high-quality programs while attracting a diverse group of participants. In addition, it frames some broader recommendations for the future of national service.

Launching AmeriCorps: First-Year Implementation of the National and Community Service Trust Act of 1993

July 6, 2007

The National and Community Service Trust Act of 1993 spurred the creation and expansion of national service activities throughout the US, relying on the states to determine how best to implement programs locally. P/PV undertook a long-term study to document this process, paying particular attention to the nature and progress of the federal-state relationship that the Act employed to get programs up and running quickly throughout the country. This report chronicles the first year of implementation, drawing on extensive interviews with key staff members of the Corporation for National Service, state commission heads and board members, and on observations of implementation activities in nine of the participating states. A close review of developments at both the policy and implementation levels reflects the challenges and opportunities presented by the joint federal-state approach, as well as the extent to which states were able to get programs up and running quickly to satisfy this ambitious legislative mandate.

Making a Difference in Schools: The Big Brothers Big Sisters School-Based Mentoring Impact Study Executive Summary

June 26, 2007

Serving almost 870,000 youth nationwide, school-based mentoring is one of the fastest growing forms of mentoring in the US today. Making a Difference in Schools presents findings from a landmark random assignment impact study of Big Brothers Big Sisters School-Based Mentoring -- the first national study of this program model. This executive summary highlights nine key findings from the full report and outlines several recommendations for policy and practice.

Multiple Choices After School: Findings from the Extended-Service Schools Initiative

June 1, 2002

In the summer of 2002, every state became eligible to receive federal funds for after-school programs. With this opportunity came the need to make decisions about the goals, design and content of after-school programming -- decisions that will influence which youth participate, what they experience and how they may benefit. This report aims to put policymakers and program operators on firmer ground as they grapple with these decisions; it shares lessons from existing school-based after-school programs.

Resident Involvement in Community Change: The Experiences of Two Initiatives

June 12, 1999

The 1990s saw a resurgence of interest in community development initiatives targeting poor and disadvantaged communities. That resurgence involves at least one major assumption: that involving residents -- both adults and youth -- creates community ownership and increases grassroots participation in ways that will ultimately lead to stronger, more sustainable initiatives. This report examines the development of resident involvement strategies in eight sites participating in P/PV's Community Change for Youth Development (CCYD) initiative and Plain Talk, The Annie E. Casey Foundation's initiative to prevent teen pregnancy (which P/PV evaluated). The authors identify three stages of resident involvement observed across all eight sites; document the ways in which residents contributed to the local site activities; and discuss the challenges of resident governance strategies.

Expanding Resources for Service: Strategies from State Commissions

May 1, 1997

In response to the passage of the National and Community Service Trust Act in 1993, state-level Commissions were created to direct federal funds to local service programs, monitor program progress and quality, and to determine the content and direction of service activity across their states. This report builds on a 30-month study of the implementation of AmeriCorps, the signature component of the 1993 Act, and describes what states and their Commissions are doing to realize the promise that service holds, while fulfilling their legislated mandate.

The Essential Connection: Using Evaluation to Identify Programs Worth Replicating

September 1, 1995

This publication describes how to use practical evaluation methods to identify social programs that are both effective and capable of being successfully transferred to new settings. It also provides guidance in making sound decisions about the suitability of investing time and money in program expansion.

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