Public/Private Ventures (P/PV)

Legacy Collection

Innovation. Research. Action.

After almost 35 years Public/Private Ventures (P/PV) has ceased operations. The organization leaves behind an incredible legacy of knowledge, including hundreds of research reports, case studies and evaluations about how best to improve programs and outcomes for children, youth and families. We are fortunate that P/PV has decided to archive its publications collection with the Foundation Center's IssueLab so that practitioners can benefit from this knowledge for years to come.

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Navigating the Child Support System: Lessons from the Fathers at Work Initiative

February 10, 2009

Research shows that nearly half of all children born in the US today will be eligible for child support before they reach the age of 18. Many low-income, noncustodial fathers -- who often struggle to make these payments -- will seek services from workforce development organizations. Yet, understanding the child support enforcement system can be challenging -- not only for noncustodial fathers but also for the workforce organizations that want to assist them.Navigating the Child Support System aims to help meet this challenge by providing information, resources and tools to use at the intersection of workforce development and child support enforcement. The guide is based on lessons from the Fathers at Work initiative, a three-year, six-site demonstration funded by the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, which was designed to help young, noncustodial fathers achieve increased employment and earnings, involvement in their children's lives, and more consistent financial support of their children.The guide describes child support enforcement regulations, policies and actions that can affect fathers' willingness to seek formal employment and participate in the system, and provides examples of four services that organizations might offer to benefit fathers and their families. Navigating the Child Support System offers concrete suggestions for incorporating child support services into workforce organizations' assistance to low-income, male participants, including developing partnerships with local child support enforcement agencies. It includes seven tools for learning about child support and setting goals for enhancing services to noncustodial fathers.

Targeting Industries, Training Workers and Improving Opportunities: The Final Report from the Sectoral Employment Initiative

November 30, 2008

Over the past 30 years, American workers have faced daunting challenges, including declines in real wages and dwindling upward mobility. Paths to advance within companies have deteriorated, leaving many low-skilled workers "stuck" indefinitely in low-wage jobs -- and swelling the ranks of the working poor. As opportunities for less-educated workers to access well-paying jobs grow scarce, it is clear that our nation requires new approaches to workforce development.In a departure from traditional strategies, some workforce organizations have begun to implement services and activities that focus on the needs of specific industry sectors. By identifying local sectors that lack workers -- which might range from health care to manufacturing to construction -- these organizations can help low-income workers acquire the specific skills they need to fill available positions. To explore the potential of this approach, P/PV launched the Sectoral Employment Initiative (SEI) in 1998, with support from the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation. This final report relies on data gathered during interviews with staff members at the SEI organizations and other key players in the targeted sectors, site visits, reviews of program documentation, and baseline and follow-up interviews with program participants focusing on a range of outcomes, including employment, earnings, education, housing and household income. The report presents key findings and explores some of the challenges sectoral programs encountered.

Targeting Industries, Training Workers and Improving Opportunities: The Final Report from the Sectoral Employment Initiative Executive Summary

November 30, 2008

This executive summary provides a brief look at the key findings and challenges sectoral programs encountered while participating in the Sectoral Employment Initiative (SEI). By identifying local sectors that lack workers -- which might range from health care to manufacturing to construction -- these organizations were shown, in many cases, to help low-income workers acquire the specific skills they need to fill available positions.

Disconnected Young People in New York City: Crisis and Opportunity

September 1, 2008

Commissioned by JobsFirstNYC, this report examines what is known about New York City's disconnected youth -- 16 to 24 year-olds who are not working and not in school. The report explores the roots of disconnection and identifies five priority populations of young people who are at high risk of becoming disconnected. It presents information about specific areas of the city with high concentrations of disconnected young people and summarizes a number of promising strategies for reclaiming this important human resource.

Going to Work with a Criminal Record: Lessons from the Fathers at Work Initiative

May 30, 2008

Many of the 650,000 adults released from American prisons each year find their way to One-Stops or community-based, faith-based and other organizations that provide employment services. Yet relatively few of these organizations specifically target former prisoners. Workforce development practitioners have experience with a wide range of job seekers, but a great number of them are looking for additional guidance about the complexities of connecting formerly incarcerated people to the labor market and helping them stay on the job.Going to Work with a Criminal Record was developed to help meet this need. It is based on lessons from the Fathers at Work initiative, a three-year, six-site demonstration funded by the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation to help young, noncustodial fathers achieve increased employment and earnings, involvement in their childrens lives, and more consistent financial support of their children. The report describes seven fundamental lessons workforce organizations should consider as they help formerly incarcerated people move toward stable employment, along with a more detailed discussion of how program staff can put these lessons into practice. It outlines how to avoid mistakes and how to develop important relationships, including with employers, parole officers and the local child support enforcement agency.

Here to Stay: Tips and Tools to Hire, Retain and Advance Hourly-Wage Workers

May 1, 2007

Much has been written about retaining high performers and upper management. But where can businesses go for advice about keeping their lesser-skilled, hourly-wage workers? P/PV has addressed the gap with this new guide. Based on the practices of businesses that value their workers, Here to Stay offers a series of cost-effective actions, including hiring the right people, welcoming them, retaining them and developing their talents for the company's benefit. Workforce organizations can use the guide to understand business practices that keep lower-income workers on the job; to generate ideas to help employer partners who are experiencing high turnover; to provide content for newsletters, presentations or workshops for the business community; and as a resource -- and a thank you -- to businesses that hire their job seekers.

netWORKS: A Guide to Expanding the Employment Networks of Low-Income People

July 1, 2006

A companion to our Getting Connected report, this user-friendly guide offers practical ideas and step-by-step guidance on how organizations can incorporate networking into their programs. netWORKS provides detailed instructions for classroom activities and assignments, and indispensable "tip sheets" on everything from planning a networking party to networking online.

Job Development Essentials: A Guide for Job Developers, Second Edition

June 22, 2005

"Job Development Essentials Second Edition" provides practical advice for workforce development professionals -- the same advice found in the first edition, but with a stronger emphasis on engaging employers, providing expanded services to the business community and involving business people as resources and advocates for an organization.

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